Now available: February 2024 edition of "The Grower-Perfumer's Diary or, Creating a Perfume Permaculture Paradise."

What do grower perfume and perfume permaculture look like?

Yesterday I put these plants into the ground: Braeburn and honeycrisp apples; Panamint nectarine; sweet almond; grafted 3 cultivars of Asian pear; Santa Rosa, Shiro, French Prune, and Japanese beauty plums; plumcot; and Riesling, Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon grapes. I choose what to plant based on a combination of factors: low chill period (being in growing zone 10b), aroma (in situ and its amenability to aromatic extraction via enfleurage, tincture, steam distillation and/or spontaneous fermentation) , flavor, and other medicinal and nutritional uses. For example, the Panamint nectarine is both intensely flavorful and sweet with a balanced acidity, AND, it is highly aromatic.
 
Even though I frequently buy plants that are self fertile, a second specimen in that species (can be a different cultivar) can increase yield dramatically via cross pollination (xenogamy) and also increase resistance to pests and disease. 
 
Being completely off grid we recycle our water to gravity feed the plants and are in the process of adding composting of food and a composting toilet to the acreage.
 
More to come…